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Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Malibu Residents Voice Frustrations and Concerns

BY BILL KOENEKER

Reorganization meetings of the Malibu City Council have changed over the last two years.
As one longtime council member put it last year. “Since when did the meeting become a platform for everybody else’s agenda?”
That being the case, though, this is what everybody else had to say about items that had nothing to do with the changing of the gavel on the dais.
Sweetwater Mesa resident Jim Smith said he noticed the disappearance of owls and birds on and around his property which is surrounded by vacant land and a few neighbors.
He said he found out there were 14 bait stations placed around his neighbor’s house loaded with an anticoagulant to kill off mice and rats more potent than the warfarin that is currently used in most residential poisons.
“It is only available from commercial outfits,” he said. “The EPA is trying to put restrictions on it. There are other ways to get rid of pests.”
Smith said his neighbor “felt terrible” when he was told about what had happened.
Smith said he would like to see the city council enact some kind of measure, under what powers it has, to either outlaw the stuff, restrict it or even require the commercial pest control operations to be cognizant of the powerful domino effects of anticoagulants. The chemical has an equally insidious effect on wildlife as smaller animals, which have ingested the anticoagulant, that is stored in the body, are eaten by predators and the chemical moves up the food chain.
On another item not on the agenda, Mikail Antrios, who says he is an artist who came down out of the hills of Malibu, offered some advice to council members about the proposed Cultural Arts Commission now in the formative stages. City officials have urged artists to join, though they seem to be slow to do so.
Antrios, a painter, said rules, regulations and commissions are anathema to the artists.
 In a statement that left some scratching their heads, he said what the commission needs is a czar or a king. Antrios said art by its nature should have some dangerous element to it. He said art should not be driven by committees or commissions, but a personality needs to drive decisions.
On another issue, several speakers, including Robert Richstone said they wanted to urge the city council to support Prop 37, a measure on the November ballot that would require the labeling of genetically modified food in the state of California.
Richstone said people have a fundamental right to know what is in their food.
“What are the big corporations hiding?” he asked. He said that GMO could weaken the strength of the world’s food supplies. Most people, he said do not know what is in their foods. “Very few people know,” he said.
John Mazza talked about Terry Tubesteak Tracy, who recently passed away. “He was the Big Kahuna,” said Mazza, who recalled how Tubesteak quit his job  and moved to Malibu Beach where he lived in a shack and surfed. “He was the personification of the surf culture,” Mazza said, adding he had the biggest influence on the surf culture and “probably did more than anyone else to put us on the map.”
Tracy’s life was written about by the author of the “Gidget” series.

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